Many people often wonder what types of pollutants they end up releasing into their own homes once they use a product that’s designed to help keep their homes clean. Simply put, there are all sorts of common household products that rely on manufacturing that’s petroleum-based in nature. Because of this, they can end up releasing toxic compounds into your home. These types of chemicals are classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as being VOCs, or volatile organic compounds. These compounds include airborne emissions such as car exhaust and formaldehyde. Furthermore, they can also include consumable compounds such as acetic acid and ethanol.

VOCs are extremely dangerous to inhale into the body, even in very small amounts. Over time, these compounds can end up causing an individual to develop headaches and/or nausea. They can also cause areas such as your throat, eyes, and nose to become irritated. There are some VOCs that have also been linked to developing conditions such as asthma and allergies.

In terms of the products that can cause the most pollution in your home, one of them includes Wet Ones wipes, which were found to produce the most harmful compounds every time they were used – to be exact, nearly half a kilogram. A similar situation was found to have occurred with the use of Mrs. Meyer’s air freshening spray. Air freshening sprays in general have been found to also release the most VOCs – approximately 700 milligrams per use.

VOC levels have also been found, after research, to be between two and five times higher while either used or stored indoors as opposed to being stored or used anywhere outdoors. As previously stated, exposure to these types of chemicals can result in all sorts of health issues, and they can even cause damage to your central nervous system, liver, and/or kidneys.

Here is a list of products that release the most VOCs separated by category and the product that fits within it:

  • Wet Ones wipes: 1,272.3 milligrams of VOCs released, -187% change in air quality
  • Mrs. Meyer’s air freshening spray, 987.3 milligrams of VOCs released, -145% change in air quality
  • Raid Ant & Roach insect pesticide spray, 310.9 milligrams of VOCs released, -46% change in air quality
  • Mrs. Meyer’s glass cleaning spray, 299.3 milligrams of VOCs released, -44% change in air quality
  • Cetaphil makeup remover, 161.4 milligrams of VOCs released, -24% change in air quality
  • Pledge wood cleaner, 129.8 milligrams of VOCs released, -19% change in air quality
  • Dawn dishwashing soap, 47.5 milligrams of VOCs released, -7% change in air quality
  • Dove body wash, 14.2 milligrams of VOCs released, -2% change in air quality
  • Febreeze plug-in air freshener, 10.8% of VOCs released, -2% change in air quality
Thank you for visiting Bates Cleaning, an Austin cleaning service. If you need help cleaning your home during these cold winter months contact our office today.